The Schertler David Amp II

One of the great features built in to WordPress is the ability to track what people are reading and what kind of search results draw them to a blog. I’ve noticed that many people end up at The GUITAR CAVE looking for info on the Schertler David amplifier, so I thought I would give an update on this fine piece of equipment. I’ve already given a brief overview HERE, so in this post I’m going to go over some of the best features and give a playing demonstration. Keep in mind that there are a lot of factors that make up a guitar sound. While I love my Saga Gitane 320D, it is certainly not what people would describe as a top of the line Manouche guitar. Pick-ups, string choice, touch and attack of the player also have a lot to do with how good the sound emanating from the amplifier is going to be.

The David has two channels, which is really cool for guitarists and has come in handy for me in live situations. Here is a video of Romane and Stochelo Rosenberg playing Double Jeu. If you notice in the beginning, Stochelo has a cable protruding from his guitar, which I think is from a Bigtone pickup that is located in the guitar bridge. Both he and Romane have the clip-on Audio Technica mics and there is another mic (Shure?) between them. So they are picking up the sound and vibrations of the guitars from 2-4 sources. I do the same thing, albeit in a much more lo-fi manner. I use the Schertler Basik Electrostatic Pickup on the face of the guitar and I have a homemade bar pick-up that the guy who sets up my guitar made inside the sound-hole. The Schertler handles the main part of the sound load and the internal mic provides ambiance and air. I use a L R Baggs Para DI, which is kind of essential for getting the EQ and volume working right. The Schertler has many options too, so there is a lot of playing around you must do to get a good sound. But it is possible as I think the video below proves.

Another important feature of the Schertler David is the Resonance Filter, which STOPS FEEDBACK COLD!! This control works really well when used in conjunction with the Schertler Basik pick-up. I’ve never had a problem with feedback and I’ve done gigs in some loud situations including The Brooklyn Museum and a few dance parties. This is described by SchertlerHERE in a way that sounds really technical and stuff:


“At the touch of a button, David’s “warm” filter on the STAT channel eliminates the harsh upper-frequency sound of many undersaddle pickups. For microphone users, Schertler’s “resonance” control on the DYN channel allows the musician to attenuate the specific low-mid frequencies that often produce feedback or an unnatural bottom-end. Both channels can be used simultaneously and blended on the amplifier’s control panel.

If you don’t use two pickups, don’t use a transducer pickup or use only 1 pickup, this is still a good little amp. You can use the other channel for another instrument or a microphone for vocals. I like to use my Gretsch to get an amplified Django/Wes Montgomery type jazz sound. Playing the Gretsch through the Baggs preamp and then into the David gives an appreciation for how loud this amp can go. This amp and pickup system also work well if you play bluegrass, country, western swing, blues or other types of acoustic music where you need a good sound and reliable stuff.

Here is a video with an assortment of musical styles and guitars all played through the amp. I start off on my Guild with a bit of Keith Richards Beggars Banquet-era Prodigal Son, then some You Gotta Move, then Led Zeppelin’s In My Time of Dying. I switch to my Gitane and do some Gypsy Jazz stuff. At the end I’m playing along with Pearl Django, a song called Radio City Rhythm, which was written by the late Dudley Hill; a wonderful swing, chord-melody player, who was in the group until he passed away a few years ago.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s