Paco de Lucia (II)

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I posted here about Paco de Lucia in the wake of his death a few years ago. Lately I have been playing the album and song Zyryab constantly. What an amazing piece of music! Named after Ziryab, a 9th century poet and musician who many credit with introducing Spain to the Persian lute, which would evolve into the Spanish guitar. The album also features jazz keys virtuoso Chick Corea and flamenco guitarist Manolo Sanlúcar. There are many live versions of this on YouTube, but this one below from 1992 in Sevilla, Spain is really hard to beat. It’s amazing how much more awesome Paco looks and sounds playing this compared to EVERYONE ELSE on YouTube. I mean, seriously, it’s not even close.

I also watched this documentary again recently. It has English subtitles and is REALLY GOOD retrospective of Paco’s life, has many great live performances, and also has a lot of camera time with the maestro himself. The viewer can really get a a great sense of the man behind the artist. The word that always comes to mind when I hear or see Paco (aside from virtuoso or maestro) is dignity. He had a very fiery and explosive passion that was always balanced with the softest musical side known to man. The kind of control needed to strike that balance can only be found in a real genius. The world and music is poorer for him not being around anymore.

http://tvpacodelucia.blogspot.com.es/ is also a very good link for all things Paco, flamenco and guitar-o. Really cool stuff. The more I’ve listened to Paco lately the more I realize how much of a huge influence he had on Manouche Superstar Stochelo Rosenberg. Probably only 2nd or 3rd after Django Reinhardt and Stochelo’s father or uncle. You can really hear the influences on The Rosenberg Trio’s albums Sueños Gitanos and Gipsy Summer both of which I have. While Stochelo almost always plays with a plectrum and doesn’t employ any obvious flamenco technique that I know of, he certainly channels the sound and feel of the music very well and his compositions are always exciting, colorful, and passionate. There is a lot of crossover between gypsy music and flamenco (and that probably is part of the “tribute” behind the song Zyryab). I’m sure Paco de Lucia appreciated Django’s brilliance as well. Paco played the yearly Django Festival at Samois in 2010, a few years before he died. For any aspiring guitarists out there looking for influences, it’s hard to go wrong with guys like Django and Paco!

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