Rock! in Peace Ed King

Guitar legend Ed King passed away yesterday. A founding member of the Strawberry Alarm Clock and a member of the original Lynyrd Skynyrd, Ed was a great player and writer, helping to pen fantastic rock hits like Incense and Peppermints, Sweet Home Alabama, Saturday Night Special, Working for MCA, and Whiskey Rock-a-Roller. While he originally joined Skynyrd to play bass, original bassist Leon Wilkeson returned to the band after the first album, Pronounced ‘Lĕh-‘nérd ‘Skin-‘nérd was recorded, enabling Skynyrd’s patented 3 guitar attack (Gary Rossington, Allen Collins, Ed King) to take flight. The band had great success through the 70s but personal issues caused King to leave suddenly in the middle of the 1975 Torture Tour. He returned to the reformed, crash band in the 1980s until health problems forced him from the road permanently in 1996.

HOLY SMOKIN’ 60s BATMAN! That’s pretty cool, isn’t it? Kind of hard to square “Incense” with Freebird or Sweet Home Alabama, yet the common denominator is all of the tasty sounds Ed produces on guitar. He always had a very unique playing style—he just looks different than most guitar players when he picks. This is his most famous moment; the song and solo …I heard ol’ Neil put her down…we don’t need him around anyhow.

As I related in the Lynyrd Skynyrd post from a bunch of years ago, I found a VHS bootleg recording of this 1975 Winterland Show in a video store long before it was online or most people knew it existed. At the time Ed King had his own online forum and he answered people’s questions and had his own commentary on various aspects of his career. It was really interesting and cool how open he was to interacting with people (like me) asking him stupid questions like, “Do you remember this gig? Did you know it was filmed?” (He did, and, there was a project in the works at the time that didn’t come to complete fruition).

While Ed had many great musical moments throughout his career, Skynyrd’s Second Helping album may be the pinnacle. It certainly has always rated high on my list. Besides co-writing and playing the lead on Alabama, he does the same on another Skynyrd standard (the oft set opener) Working for MCA. He also played the tasty slide on the acoustic number The Ballad of Curtis Lowe and performed all of the James Burton-esque riffing on his co-written Swamp Music. If that ain’t enough, he also wrote the liner notes for the album, and as albums go, especially 1970 rock albums, they don’t come any better than the first 2 Skynyrd records.

As the vid above shows, long after Ed was out of the professional game, he was still the consummate guitar picker and guitar fan. There are many videos out there with Ed talking about guitar, Lynyrd Skynyrd and music, music, music. He was a great player, a member of one of my favorite bands, and I feel lucky that I got to interact with him very briefly online. It’s sad to see him go, but I wish him Happy Trails and know that he’ll be jamming with all of the other great ones in that big band in the sky!

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