Equipment

Stuff from the Vault

I moved recently and during the process found a some items from back in the day that I’ll be posting over the next few weeks. I’ve decided I’ll turn the blog into a kind of an online scrapbook — crammed with all kinds of things from my life. But variety is the spice of life. Anyhow, the pic above of Kirk Hammett is from an old magazine. I had to get rid of a bunch of old books and magazines ’cause I moved to a smaller place. But I tried to keep interesting or photogenic things so they will turn here at some point. Kirk Hammett is one of the great players the last thirty years. He’s had a pretty great career and his band was mega-influential too! Also, I used to play through a Mesa Boogie. Loved it!

Today — I have a few pics that were taken at a Johnny Winter show in the early 2000s. I think this was at BB King’s in NYC. Johnny wasn’t in the best of shape; this was after he fell and broke his hip, hadn’t recuperated fully, and was on a lot of drugs. The story of those days, which involved a possible shady manager, is not a very good one. But thankfully Johnny got better and did really well in his final years. From what I remember, at this gig he played almost all blues and ended with Highway 61 Revisited on his old Firebird.

BB Kings was kind of a weird place, but it hosted a whole lot of pretty impressive shows over an almost 20 year residence. It closed earlier this year. Supposedly they are looking for a new space and hopefully they find one, but it ain’t gonna be easy, because everywhere is expensive and the brick and mortar can’t afford it, including the clubs and music venues. Most of the music stores are already gone. But this night with Johnny Winter occurred back in a cheaper and more appealing time. It was my girlfriend’s birthday and, in addition to hearing some great music, we ate way too much and drank way too much…and then we ate more and drank more with the other couple at the table. We were a mess getting home that night for sure! Back then eating and drinking at BB Kings Time Square was like eating and drinking in Atlanta or something. All of the portions were effing HUGE! Even the mix drinks were huge. I think my girlfriend’s gin and tonic was 32oz! The club is downstairs like a cavern, and then when the show is over and you are BLOTTO from drinking a bunch of 32 oz alcoholic drinks…you ascend and exit directly into THE LIGHTS OF TIMES SQUARE! Total stimulation overload…like if the police pull you over and shine a flashlight in your face! It will either make you lose your buzz or fall over. We barely avoided falling over. GOOD TIMES!


Long Strange Trip — Movie Review

Update: I have decided to use a new rating system for everything I review. So I am putting the 4-star rating on this post even though it has been up for a week. I re-watched parts of this documentary and it is definitely as good as it gets. I can’t recommend enough!

Thanks to friends in the business, I was able to watch the “sprawling” Grateful Dead Documentary, Long Strange Trip over a few nights last week. Most people will need a few nights as the movie, or collection of long video chapters, totals over four hours in length! Holy Cow, just like one of those versions of Dark Star in the mid-70s! The film is directed by Amir Bar-Lev, who I have never heard of prior to this, but he is originally from Berkeley, is a total Dead Head, favors 1973 and Dark Star as Best Year/Cut and specializes in Documentary-type films so basically…he was a natural to assemble? create? manufacture? this film. Martin Scorsese is one of the executive producers as is Dead drummer, Bill Kreutzmann’s son, Justin. All of the remaining members of the Dead are also involved in the film and are interviewed as are many others who were involved with the organization. Of course, Jerry Garcia makes many appearances in “celluloid” only, but he is there nonetheless…(as he would have to be).

I have to say, I think everyone involved did a masterful job and the movie is interesting, moving, inspirational, informative, entertaining and evocative. In some spots Long Strange Trip is also funny as hell and it doesn’t matter if you’re laughing “with” or “at”… or “both”. It’s as grand and expansive as the United States of America and it is a tale that really could only be set in this country. I don’t think one necessarily has to have been (or be) a Deadhead to enjoy the film, because the documentary nature allows for the focus of movie to shift constantly, yet always be contained within the larger world that even the Dead and their insular organization had to inhabit. Plus, it IS a pretty interesting story, especially if you as a viewer find anything about this era, style of music, or culture interesting.

The film begins in the 60s: the early days of the Beats, bluegrass, beginnings and such. We are introduced to Jerry Garcia and some of his early influences, musical and otherwise that will keep reappearing throughout the film. One is a girl (Barbara “Brigid” Meier), another is a movie, Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, which plays directly into his conception of and affection for “the weird” side of life. Garcia remains the primary focus within the larger story of the band for the duration of the film and even casual fans of the band are cognizant of this truism; the story of the band is the story of Garcia and it begins and ends with him. As the film moves into the hippie years and the Acid Tests, the final coming together of a cohesive musical unit, early recordings and a plan for future world domination, the viewer is introduced to a second set of visions for the future that originate with Garcia, but will affect everyone in the Grateful Dead: Jerry wants to have fun, business is for businessmen, six different people from different musical backgrounds will play fantastic, spontaneous in-the-moment music by listening to each other, and no one will be in charge. As the band comes together and is ALIVE, the movie uses the Frankenstein motif of creating a monster, tying together these sets of influences and early motivations that will continually appear throughout the rest of the movie.

The six chapters that make up the movie focus on these early beginnings, success in Europe in the early 1970s, the roadies and others within the Dead organization, things get out of control in the mid-70s, a triumphant return as a completely professional band, the band’s fans including the tapers, the success and downfall of the 1980s and 1990s. This breaks the long film up in an effective manner, especially if viewed on disc. Given the ambitious amount of material that the director set out to cover and all of the threads he needed to pull together to effectively illustrate how The Dead succeeded, sort of, kind of, but then it all went wrong (and was always destined to go wrong) had to have been pretty daunting task, but he pulled it off. I’m not sure I agree with the movie’s conclusions, but that will be discussed in a separate post because I’m trying to avoid spoilers if someone reads this and still hasn’t seen the movie. But you’ll see and hear Phil, and Pigpen, and Bob, Mickey, Egypt, the drugs, Bill, the wives and girlfriends, everyone on the set of Playboy After Dark getting dosed, The Wall of Sound, the endless tours, the good years and the bad, the laughs and the highs and lows, and well…everything. It’s all there and a lot of the footage is new and some of it is pretty amazing. There is one session of Garcia, Lesh and Weir working out their vocals on an early version of Candyman and that was way cool. I’d watch hours of clips like that, believe-you-me.

I was never a Deadhead; but I did see them once and I count American Beauty and Workingman’s Dead as two of the best albums of the 1970s (and some of the band’s best work) and they obviously occupy a special niche in music history. There really was no one else like them and there couldn’t be anyone else like them for the simple reason that it’s a miracle the project ever got out of the garage. I think the film does a good job at avoiding over-sentimentalizing some of the more mythical or dangerous aspects of the scene and some of my favorite moments include monologues and thoughts from Sam Cutler, road manager to the Dead, (and the Rolling Stones on their ’69 tour). He is a dissenting, ornery, voice of the outsider throughout the movie and indicative of characters of that time. (He seems to be the guy who lives in a van down by the river these days? But likes it?). He and Warner Brothers president, Joe Smith provide much-needed blasts of oxygen to counter the overkill Nitrous high of Grateful Dead weirdness, hippy fan adulation, roadie enthusiasm and Al Franken. Yes, Al is in the movie too and is a righteous Deadhead. I did not know that.

So the takeaway should be: See this movie because you’ll enjoy it. Grab your favorite sweets or sweetie, refreshments, *favors*, and flavors and boogie on down that grand highway of life like the band did all of those years ago. They were a special collection of people and it was a special time in history that will soon be gone forever.

Django — Bebop and Electric

Culled from sessions that occurred in 1947 and the early 1950s, this GREAT collection contains many of Django Reinhardt’s final musical statements. The Brussels sessions, recorded in 1947, begin the experimental/transitional arc of Django’s later career, which would continue on other sources, ie. the Rome sessions from 1949-50 (I wrote about here.) The fourth electric side of “Rome” contained fun tunes like Micro, Dream of You, Place De Brouckere, Double Whiskey, and amplified versions of Minor Swing and Dinette that seem in line with the new Django, but the session(s) seem to suffer from lack of purpose, joy and a good recording environment. But back on this Hot Club of France Quintet CD (for stuff from 1950-1953) there are many (well recorded) sessions from Paris that portray a Django completely cut loose from his past. Django bounced back from severe apathy and disenchantment to record a really nice blast of music that is refreshingly original, yet very true to his earlier roots. He had experienced a loss artistic stature because of the end of the Swing Era and his failure to connect with a large audience in the United States on his 1946-47 tour with Duke Ellington. His health (he lost many teeth) and financial situation, along with a temporary loss of muse, did nothing to allay his legendary apathy and dark moods. However, he gradually recovered a sense of purpose, thanks to a new music, a new way of playing guitar and willing young players eager to jam with the master.

Soon after the end of World War II in 1945, Django began appearing with either an electric or amplified instrument although he still played acoustic occasionally… (On this dubbed movie clip of Nuits de Saint Germain des Prés [which is on this Hot Club of France Quintet CD] and on 3 sides of the …In Rome Sessions that he plays with Grappelli.) (You can see Django looking out the train window at the beginning of his segment that was part of the 1952 movie, La Route du Bonheur that also featured jazz legends Louis Armstrong and Sidney Bechet). Django’s new electric sound allowed his playing to reach previously unknown heights and brought him more in line with the mainstream American jazz guitar artists of the time. While in the States he had jammed with Les Paul, Johnny Smith and Harry Volpe (I wrote about this here) and played American guitars as multiple photographs of the time show. By all accounts Django was thrilled with the possibilities that playing an electrified instrument afforded, however he still preferred his Selmer guitar fitted now with a Stimer pickup through a Stimer amp to all of those “tinpot” American guitars as he was known to refer to them.

But Django did not play the Selmer exclusively. This article and these pictures from the late 40s (1948) show Django performing with a Rio Guitar at the Nice Festival. (This link leads to a really great and informative Django site!!) (Incidentally, the Nice Festival, the first international jazz festival of any renown, debuted in 1948 with Louis Armstrong and His All-Stars as the headliner with Django and Stephane Grappelli among the supporting acts.) For the first time in Django’s 15 year career his guitar carried over the band; he could vary his attack from a bluesy whisper to screaming arpeggio runs and crunchy chords, and milk the instrument for all manner of delightful new tones. On this CD I believe some of the chord stabs and comping fills (that were a bit different from all of his masterful acoustic comping) take on almost a Les Paul/Chet Atkins/Barney Kessel-type rockabilly vibe in some cases and it sounds to me that Django is completely stoked with how it sounds. Likewise, his live performances at Clubs like the Saint Germaine during this period have been hailed as some of the most enjoyable and fully realized gigs (by both band and audience) of his career.

There are people, Stephane Grappelli for one, who believe that Django never got a handle on the electric guitar and that he should’ve stayed with his early choice of instrument. In some ways, this is a valid criticism, especially if you are a fan of the original Hot Club sound (all acoustic/guitars/bass/violin) or enjoy the material from the prewar period. There is a certain charm about that approach to jazz that persists to this day, however, a lot of Django’s later material was obviously inspired by his instrument switch. The change may have been what drove him to play and compose again and his change in style definitely attracted the younger set to his gigs. As I have written Django’s March, 1953 electric take of Night and Day (which along with his final take of Nuages [from the same session] which aren’t on this CD but SHOULD be), is the cut that inspired me to learn how to play jazz. On this track he simultaneously anticipates Miles Davis Cool and West Coast Jazz and digs for a distorted solo that is chock-full of spiraling, quick-picked guitar obbligatos and partial blues/diminished chords that are completely his own invention. A totally fun and outrageous melodic interpretation of a song he obviously enjoyed playing. I have no doubt from these later cuts that had Django lived into his 50s or 60s and continued working he would kept on evolving both his sound and approach to his instrument because above all else he had that JOY of playing the instrument that anyone who is reading this knows about. I don’t have to tell you…he was totally like that too. That almost childlike sense of wonder: “Wow…I can make it do this?”….”Cool” or “Bien” (I guess it would be)

The first 9 cuts on the CD were recorded in 1947 with a band that featured one of his favorite sidemen, Hubert Rostaing, on clarinet. These tracks include “bridge” songs that show Django’s movement from the Swing Era to the 1950s: Just One of Those Things, Songe D’Automne, Del Salle, and Porto Cabello, with other more obvious nods to the destination including Duke and Dukie and Babik (Bi-Bop). All of these tunes feature Eugene Vees playing the swing style pomp guitar to varying degrees which helps make these tunes sound like they could’ve been on the Rome Sessions. Django hasn’t completely left the past behind yet. With Double Whiskey (track 10) through the end of the disc, Chez Moi, Django and his band are completely reborn; there are no pompé guitar rhythms, there IS plenty of brass (Hubert Fol, Roger Guerin and Bernard Hullin) and drums (Pierre Lemarchand) and a very mainstream (almost American) small combo sound. Through it all, of course, is a whole bunch of absolutely amazing guitar playing. Like the final take of Night and Day, Django channels every electric guitar technique and sound from the future into his final batch of recordings.

Porto Cabello begins with a very haunting melody, reminiscent of Debussy perhaps, with Django playing spare figures behind. The amplified acoustic Selmer has the ability to sound semi-acoustic or semi-electric depending on Django mood. After the intro the song kicks into a key and tempo change that is completely out of the blue that features a great, very amplified solo by a Django. After a slurry, quick solo by Rostaing, the song returns to the intro tempo and fades out on that melody just as quickly as it had changed initially. It calls to mind passing boats in the harbor or a street scene even though it is subtitled “Il Mexicana”. Duke and Dukie, another Django original, is a very simple harmonic progression that allows space Django to inject cool chord stabs, octaves, and a whole flurry of single-note lines around a great rhythmic pulse. It’s a very cool early 50s vibe and there are two takes of this song on the disc. Babik (also called Bi-Bop), named for Django’s son is built off of the Dizzy Gillespie early 40s Salt Peanuts riff. Django and company take the song to new dimensions and they sound as modern and on it as Bireli Lagrene’s Gipsy Project circa 2004, the difference being that Django is playing with a drummer, Pierre Fouad. This adds a completely new dimension to the sound of a Django band and gives him a more universally recognized jazz sound. Other titles, that feature the horns of Hubert Fol, Roger Guerin and Bernard Hullin, like Double Whiskey, Crazy Rhythm, Keep Cool, and Fine and Dandy (all covers except Double Whiskey) sound very American…almost Vegas/Hollywood Movie cool. It’s a sound that Django and his Quintet wear well and I believe he was probably very happy with how these recordings came out. Not only does he sound superb as a guitarist, writer, leader, but his band is hot and plays the material well.

Other tracks are total guitar standouts — Impromptu, which is Django’s hit, Dark Eyes redone as a frantic and angular bebop; Fleche D’or, a completely dizzying guitar and sax extravaganza that anticipates hard rock and fusion; the cool, laid back, Latin vibe of Troublant Bolero; and the insistent, suave, uptempo 50s sound of Nuits De Saint Germaine De Pres. On all of these tracks one can hear Django spinning his ideas out on the fly; the master improviser with new tools, a new format and a new lease on life…and art. This is also apparent on all of the blues/rhythm and blues found on the disc: I Cover the Waterfront, DR Blues, Dream of You, Vamp, Le Soir, and Deccarphonie. Django always enjoyed playing the blues and his understanding of the blues is another element that I think was expanded on his trip to the US because these blues all have an atmosphere that was lacking on his previous efforts. Deccarphonie also features superb vibes played by Martial Solal! But perhaps the best example of this was the ballad that he felt defined this whole period and who he was at this stage in his career, Anouman (A new man). He gives the very colorful and almost wistful melody (head) line to Hubert Fol and is content to solo only on the middle eight. But it is the chords fills, ghostly reverb presence of his guitar throughout the song that puts one in the mind of the story of how Django could lay by a river and listen to it for hours on end. Here at the end of his career he was no longer just showing how well a composer or improviser he was. He had transcended his station and synthesized all of his influences and life experiences into pure art and music.

The one definable quality that is constant in Django’s playing that you won’t find in most modern gypsy jazz is his powerful emotionalism, subtlety and minimalist expression. While Django could play complicated arpeggios and octagonic scale patterns at blinding speed with the best of them, he often chose to play slim, bent figures and quiet slurs to accentuate the emotional colors of his music. He also made great use of space and time to let the music breath. Even in the frenzied days of bebop, the world moved at a much slower pace than it does today and this definitely accounts for the speed and which people hear and feel. However, it is on this collection of songs, with Django’s full maturity as an accomplished player/composer realized that what he chooses not to play is what makes these cuts so interesting. This is one reason that he still reigns over the genre; his ability to impart pure feeling and emotion along with all of the verve, color and joie de vivre of Gypsy Jazz. It’s shame he left this world so soon after because it was obvious he still had plenty to say…and play!

Happy 2017

bill

I hope everyone had a great holiday season and is looking forward to the New Year! It will definitely be one full of many challenges. I think we can agree on that, yes? No matter what comes along, music will help with anything the universe has in store. We’ve all seen how powerful the effects of music are on people in all kinds of situations and certainly I make it a point to never forget how healing the ability to play, listen and appreciate music is. Definitely one of the major joys of our existence on this planet. Never forget or take for granted!

Also, in the spirit of new beginnings, I am rolling out another type of Dispatch, one that will allow me to cover an assortment of small items within one post. It’s the same kind of formula as the GuitarSongs series, which I was really enjoying and will pick up again in a few weeks. ShortRiffs will cover everything going on in my life, music-related and not. The Gimme Shelter and Vital Van posts, which are full of music, but also full of other stuff, are two of the most popular posts I’ve done and I want to do more of that kind of writing. The name is a word play on the (guitar) riffs we all play combined with the old slang of “riffing”: a short piece of speech or writing that develops a particular theme or idea. Ideally, that is what I will attempt to do and maybe even have a thread that will snake through a few or several of these posts; like an old-time serial.

As always: I totally appreciate everyone who reads, comments, and sends notes. This blog is almost 6 years old with 116 posts and 50,000 visitors. I never thought it would be the thing it is today and I have only my awesome readers to thank for that! Take care and keep playing!

Jimi Hendrix in Words and Pictures (part 3)

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How to sound like Jimi Hendrix? That’s a loaded question and one people have been trying to answer for many years, obviously. I feel I am qualified to talk about it since I have played a bunch of Jimi over the years in various settings. There are a few tips and tricks I can offer and the first is always try to watch someone play live or video. Nothing beats seeing Jimi or one of the true masters play his stuff and there’s plenty to be found online. Definitely start there.

play the blues

Before one dives into the details, probably the most important and obvious thing to realize is that Jimi achieved his excellent sound and style on guitar by learning and playing blues, early rock and roll/rhythm and blues guitar. Take apart almost every song, every jam that features Jimi Hendrix and you will find the structure and sound of the blues underneath, no matter how FAR OUT the song is. Blues playing is primarily intuitive and feel-based. Jimi’s knowledge of music theory, best described by Miles Davis is his autobiography, was limited, but his ear was finely developed and he had a great musician’s instinct. According to Miles (via Jimi Hendrix: Electric Gypsy page 399): “When Miles attempted to explain musical theory, Jimi just looked blank, but once Miles played the piece, however complex it was, Jimi picked it up immediately.” Having a background in the blues enables you to comfortably navigate many styles of music. If you can’t play a half decent blues solo or are not happy with your knowledge of the blues and pentatonic scales and blues phrasing, work on that first. Definitely make sure you can navigate the fretboard in all positions. You can base the above scales or arpeggios off of the chords you are playing. Many of Jimi’s best riffs and solos come from this way of doing things. Also, make sure your bends, slurs and hammer-ons/pull-offs are as accurate and clean as you can make them. These techniques must be practiced slowly and carefully to get them right. There are many blues guitar lessons on YouTube. Look around and find ones that will help you with areas you are having trouble and practice until you have it down.

spice it up with some jazz

Though Jimi wasn’t thought of as a jazz musician by most people of his time, he was influenced very heavily by jazz icons like Wes Montgomery and, especially, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, who was instrumental in Jimi’s approach to sound collages like Third Stone From the Sun. Jazz does figure in some of the rhythmic patterns that Mitch Mitchell developed and used in songs like Manic Depression, the middle of If 6 Was 9 and very obviously the brush work (actually suggested by Noel Redding) in Up From the Skies. (Mitch had actually played in jazz bands prior to joining The Experience). Jimi rarely played the standard power chord shapes, opting instead for variations that allowed him to use his thumb to cover the bass notes. He also used very jazzy 6, 9, maj, and sus chords on songs like If 6 Was 9, Third Stone From the Sun, Love or Confusion, Angel and many others. Jimi also regularly used partial chords as runs or lead lines. This chord melody type of playing is common in jazz and is also used in rhythm and blues/Stax playing as well. There are many jazz/rock lessons as well as chord melody lessons on YouTube. Not only will this knowledge help with Jimi Hendrix tunes, but it will also expand other areas of your playing.

technical stuff

Jimi’s technique, which was developed from constant playing and a whole lot of roadwork with bands like the Isley Brothers and Little Richard, made use primarily of Fender instruments, Stratocasters especially. Jimi would restring a right-handed guitar and play it lefty, which meant that the volume and tone controls, pickup switch and whammy bar were in a different position than would be typical for a player no matter they were right or left handed (if they were playing the appropriate guitar). According to the book Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky, he would bend the whammy arms by hand to allow him “to tap each string with the bar” (?) but the book Jimi Hendrix: Electric Gypsy disputes this saying he bent the arms to allow the bar to line up with the high E string. I wouldn’t be surprised if both of these theories are wrong and he bent the arms to allow for further depression of the tremelo unit, resulting in much wider and deeper bends. From reading guitar magazines I know that Jimi favored using 4 springs for the whammy unit and used custom light strings. According to Jimi Hendrix: Electric Gypsy from September of 1966 through June of 1967 Jimi played tuned to regular concert C or E, if you prefer. (This time period would’ve included the recording of Are You Experienced?) The sessions for Experienced and the 2nd album, Axis: Bold as Love were almost back-to-back but most of the Axis album is tuned to Eb. From hereon Jimi would tune down (sometimes as low as D) and while this did allow for a “heavier”, darker guitar tone and ease of string bending, the primary reason was it was “less strain on Jimi’s voice”. He favored Marshall amps and turned everything way up, full blast! His outstanding control of his instrument and his ability to turn the sounds, noises and feedback into either vocal-quality sounds, sound effects or music was legendary (The Star Spangled Banner, Third Stones From the Sun, I Don’t Live Today). Randy Hansen, Jeff Beck, Eric Johnson and Stevie Ray Vaughan have all approached the level that Jimi had with this kind of manipulation of the instrument. He would frequently introduce himself to the audience as playing “public saxophone” and I think this illustrates that he looked at the guitar as “more than a guitar”, primarily dealt in SOUND more than TECHNIQUE or NOTES and was inspired and influenced by much more than other guitar music. Unfortunately there is no substitute for constant tweaking of one’s gear and sound to be able to replicate either Jimi’s sounds or the ones you hear in your head. Listening to and trying to replicate sounds that aren’t “music” can also broaden your approach. A major thing to understand is that these components are never the same in different rooms or situations. A player must constantly readjust as the gig goes along. Eric Johnson does this all the time. Watch him closely in these videos.

effects

While Jimi certainly made use of many different effects over the years, I’m not one of those people that believes you need to have expensive or even authentic pedals to get a sound that will reproduce a Jimi number well. I’ve certainly done without. All of those pedals are available though if you wish to go that route. Back in the late 80s I was at a jam in Brooklyn and after covering All Along the Watchtower 3 guys who had been hanging out in the lobby, including the guy who was running the studio came in and looked at my pedals. All I had was a Tube Screamer, an MXR Envelope Filter (for the wah sound) and a Boss digital delay. Without saying a word they looked at me, looked at the pedals, shook their heads and walked out. I had certainly done my homework on the solo parts of Watchtower and could play it well. I had also found some settings that really approximated the sound of the original and that night hit it perfectly right. I had a Crybaby wah-wah but did not always carry it around on the subway so that’s why I had the envelope filter instead. Worked out just fine. You would be amazed how much your hands and attitude affect how you sound. I was reading a discussion on Gearslutz the other day from people who were talking about recreating the sound of Van Halen 1. I know, guitar players can be geeks, nerds, whatever and just like to think and talk about different equipment, but you could easily sink $50,000 into a project like that, have all of the guitar and studio equipment that may or may not have been used back in 1978 and come up lacking, so keep that in mind.

putting it all together

A band I was in for a few years covered Love or Confusion live many times. By this time I no longer used a distortion pedal. I had a Mesa Boogie head and two 4×12 cabinets and just played loud using the gain from the amp. I also used a Phase 90 and an MXR Flanger and sometimes the Crybaby Wah. I never worried about playing the solo exact (and never do-just go for it!). The sound IS the thing. If you play in tune and in time and have the sound of this music (or any music) you are more than halfway there. I liked to concentrate on how the chords rang against the rhythm and the overtones at the end of each verse (and the end of the song). Eric Johnson covers this song nicely. I remember EJ said in an interview that some of the sounds Jimi got on those last stop chords reminded him of a vacuum cleaner. That’s why I spent a lot of time coming up with slightly different fingerings every time the G chords come around. I was always amazed how those parts sounded too! How did he do that? Sometimes the right amount of fuzz, vibrato and open-string overtones produced exactly what I was going for. The trick with these sus chords is to get that major/minor ambivalence thing between the strings you fret versus the strings that are ringing open. That’s how some of those cool combinations happen. I also tried do what Eric does — actually meld both of Jimi’s guitar tracks into 1! Good Times!

instruction

elecladyIn the old days these books were like the best thing, and in some ways still are. Meticulously notated for guitar, bass and drums — your whole band can look over the music and get down. You still have to bring the feel in for a lot of what you will be trying to do, but that’s where the fun is. Just like what I was talking about in the last paragraph. All of these books have tab and performance notes and I used them a bunch back in the day for songs that I hadn’t been able to pick up just by listening. All of the transcriptions were done by Andy Aledort and the performance notes and general supervision was done by jimibk2Dave Whitehill and they are both giants in the guitar biz. Usually associated with Guitar World Magazine, I’m sure their names are familiar to anyone who has been around the biz for awhile. Because they are are total pros you know there aren’t any mistakes. While I regularly find mistakes in tabs I find online or in some of the YouTube tutorials, I have never encountered one in these books. They are still very affordable and I would recommend if you are looking for accurate reproductions of Jimi’s music.

instruction II

For those who don’t want to go the book route, there are, of course, many online resources for Jimi Hendrix material. As I said in the last paragraph, however, be careful that it is a good tab or lesson or you’ll be wasting your time. I recommend watching any live Jimi you can find. Then check out Randy Hansen(!), Stevie Ray Vaughan and Eric Johnson, or some of the stuff from the Experience Hendrix tour. For lessons, here’s a series that walks you through most of the songs on the first side of Are You Experienced?. Here’s Joe Satriani showing how he plays like Jimi and here’s an interesting video on getting a sound in the vein of Jimi. YouTube is FULL of many interesting videos on playing like Jimi Hendrix so strap in, strap on the guitar and get cracking! You’ll be wowing your friends with stunning versions of his best songs in no time at all!

JHE_8

Here is Part 1 and Part 2 of this series.

Nashville Cats

Back in the mid-60s The Lovin’ Spoonful had a hit with a song about Nashville guitar players. The television appearance shown above is a little different though, isn’t it? They all look happy. (haha) I’m not sure what guitar part old Zal is playing there. Also, who the heck plays an Autoharp anywhow? Well, John Sebastian, I guess. He’s got a bit of a rock and roll pedigree. And this guy. That’s actually pretty rockin’. And…Dolly Parton plays one too. But Dolly could probably play anything and people would show up to watch her. But anyhow, what the above song illustrates is that even back in the days of the Lovin’ Spoonful, Nashville, Tennessee had a reputation as a city with lots of great guitar pickers. Chet Atkins, Jerry Reed, Fred Carter Jr. and Johnny Cash sideman Luther Perkins all made Nashville their home town and that’s just scratchin’ the surface of the people who lived there at one point. Pretty impressive, no? The city has a rich history of great music and great guitar playing and there are still a whole lot of great guitar players in Nashville. They can still play clean as country water and wild as mountain dew too! Even though modern country is not my favorite musical style, I can sure appreciate someone who plays the heck out of a guitar. Many of these guys are flat out amazing, and play a crossover blend of country, hillbilly, swing, blues, jazz, rockabilly, and rock and roll that pretty much anybody should be able to appreciate. I like the sound of this stuff and wish I could play it better. Let’s take a look-see at a few of modern Nashville’s hottest heroes.

Here’s one guy who is legendary — Brent Mason. He proves with this Fender Tele/Fender Twin – driven version of Cherokee that he can burn with the best of ’em. Thumbpicked bebop! Whoever heard of such a thing? And with some steel guitar soloing too! Ain’t that pretty? I think it is. Brent was discovered by none other than Chet Atkins after moving to Nashville from Ohio. Since those days he has appeared on thousands of records, produced a few, written some tunes and even won a Grammy Award in 2008. From a guitar standpoint though, Brent can do anything and play it well. He has many tutorial videos available and looking here and here will get you started on making his style work for you…or just provide some entertaining viewing for those slow days at work.

Here’s a video of Brent Mason playing with another Nashville killer, Johnny Hiland. Johnny is known as The Chicken Pickin’ King of Nashville these days, but it’s obvious from his videos that he’s another guy who can play just about anything. He has been on the scene for almost 20 years and has played with a huge roster of diverse artists, released his own records and has a whole bunch of instruction videos out there for aspiring guitar players. And boy is it good! Like many of us guitarists he is also a total gearhead and is always trying out new stuff so that is fun to watch too. Look for it here!

Speaking of gear and country superstars, here is Brad Paisley showing off a very pretty G-Bender Telecaster at Guitar Center. Though Brad is a country superstar, thought more of as a singer/songwriter who has sold like a billion records, he is actually a great guitar player as well. Here is a list of nice lessons on his awesome licks and technique.

Finally here is a video of another Nashville Cat, Guthrie Trapp on the Learn and Master series. Guthrie is also a great player and has played with many a country superstar over his career and the past 15 years in Nashville. I just watched this video last week and what impressed me about him the most was his touch on the guitar. If you check out the feel and fluidity when he starts playing (around the 8 minute mark) you can see why he was and is an in-demand player and session musician. Watch the whole thing! And check out some of his other stuff!

One thing I’ve learned from listening to these guys play and talk is that two guys especially cast a long shadow over the sound and approach of modern country guitar and those two guys would be 1) Merle Haggard and 2) The guitar player in Merle Haggard’s band, The Strangers Roy Nichols. Here is an interesting thread on Roy Nichols: Western Swing fan, early chicken picker, clean Telecaster tone, hybrid pick and fingers style, snappin’ and poppin’ bluesy bends, swing and jazzy lines — all of the elements of a great sound and style. Here’s a thread of Roy Nichols guitar with a whole lot of great performances by Roy and others.

Now this list isn’t supposed to be comprehensive because, as I said at the beginning, this style isn’t really my thing, but the players are great, the style is popular and the guitars sound sweet enough to make you want to practice or cry in your beer. Give ’em a listen!