Players

FLASHBACK #1

The Beach Boys with Jimmy Page 1985

I was at this Washington July 4th show back in the halcyon mid-80s. I definitely got around back then…cue the music — round, round, git around. It was only thirty years ago, but it seems like two lifetimes and it was so wild, crazy and innocent. To be in the middle of a half million people for an entire day and not even see a fistfight. Contrast that with today’s world where people get blown away with high-powered weapons because they like country music. I don’t think that is…progress. But what do I know? Anyhow, over the course of my concert-going experiences, I was at some other weird gigs and the exciting details of those events will be posts # 2, 3, 4, 5 and I know the 12 people who still visit this blog will be hanging on to hear all about it!

Back in the early 1980s The Beach Boys had developed an awesome rep for throwing huge parties on the Washington Mall for the 4th of July until the Interior Secretary of the time, James Watt, came along and said rock concerts drew the “wrong element”. Unfortunately for Watt, The Beach Boys weren’t Van Halen or Iron Butterfly; the band counted George H.W. Bush and President Ronald Reagan as friends so although Watt tried to replace the “rock concerts” with Wayne Newton, that effort was quickly scotched as people booed the concert and Watt eventually had to relent and apologize to the band. In the 90s he pleaded guilty to influence peddling and corruption charges and in 2008 he was named one of the worst cabinet members in modern history….LOL!

I was in my early 20s in 1985 and I had friends who had moved to DC after school and so I went down for the party. Not only did we party on the National Mall for the 4th, we also saw Santana in concert two days later in Columbia, Maryland. It was really great! We had nice seats and Carlos and his band were just overpowering from the first minutes. He came out first to warm up and find the sweet spots for sustain/feedback onstage while the lights were still down and he was just wailing. I’ll never forget it. He had such a great sound. There is a setlist here, but it’s incomplete because I KNOW they played their big hit, I’m Winning and it’s not listed. I seem to remember a couple of other tunes from the 2nd album like the above Incident at Neshabur, which aren’t listed either.

Anyhow…back to the 4th. We took the train into DC from Maryland and got to the Mall early. Over the course of the day a bunch of people I hadn’t seen in a few years showed up. We had a blast and the mood on the Mall was, of course, festive as only the 1980s could be. People really partied back then, lemme tell you, but it was also very mellow. The music, from the main stage began around 4pm with Southern Pacific, a band made up of Doobie Brothers and Creedence Clearwater Revival alumni. I remember the rousing version of Born on the Bayou that was the closer of the set. Of course the line “I can remember the 4th of July running through the backwoods bare…” is a sure winner for the holiday. However, that’s the only main stage act I remember until much later because of the talent wasn’t very interesting, there were delays and problems with the sound and seemingly endless radio ads. Also, I remember a second stage that was closer to where we were that had some pretty good cover bands playing and we were digging that. Because The Beach Boys, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts and The Oak Ridge Boys performed in Philadelphia in the afternoon and were traveling to Washington to do the evening set, they would arrive late. So late in fact that sets got cut and the “Boys” played during the fireworks.

By the time the main event began, we had been partying for almost 9 hours. To say we were SPICOLI-ed! is a total understatement. It was AWESOME! The crowd had swelled to half a million over the course of the day and it was really packed even where we were — so far from the stage that we could’ve been in Virginia. When the Beach Boys started playing we could hear the music and see fireworks and it was a really great show even though I’m not exactly the world’s biggest BB fan. When Mike Love announced from the stage that Mr. T and John Stamos were sitting in with the band (as percussionists), that drew much giggling and guffawing from all of us. However, when a few minutes later Love announced that the one and only Jimmy Page had “flown over from England to jam with the Beach Boys” we straightened up (kinda) and were like, “Wait, WHAT?” We didn’t know that Jimmy was supposed to play, even though there may have been some advanced warning on MTV. So even though we were about 10.5 miles from the stage, two of us guitar guys decided we had to go try and see the band. Everyone else in our group declined and tried to talk us out of going, but we were determined, so off we went.

I don’t remember how long or how far we actually walked. We were both bombed, it was completely dark except for flashes from lighters or flashlights. Helicopters with searchlights buzzed overhead, the fireworks were booming and the Beach Boys and Jimmy Page were playing Lucille. We couldn’t see where we were going and kept tripping over people who had passed out or were getting their July 4th freak on. It was completely and totally surreal. My friend stepped on somebody who started yelling and we stopped. The stage seemed even further away than when we started and Lucille was already over. With more than a little regret, we realized that we were not going to be able to see history (?) being made: The Beach Boys, Jimmy Page, Mr. T, John Stamos and others jamming together to celebrate America’s birthday. We stood where we were for a few more minutes and 5-6 more songs and then, the concert was over. Thanks to the internet, my memories, hazy though they may be, are essentially how things went down over the course of the evening. Getting out of DC on the tube was nuts; people who had been partying in the sun all day were passing out and puking all over the underground and that was just a small part of the massive (and tons of garbage) from party. GOOD TIMES! Here is a hilarious memory from John Stamos where he recalls teaching Jimmy how to play in F# and why Jimmy thought the audience was “hexing him”. Funny stuff.

This past year John Stamos hosted the annual 4th of July concert with the Beach Boys performing. Back in 1985, Stamos was known for being an actor on General Hospital, but over the years he has developed into quite the musician. While there have been many a concert for America’s Birthday since that day back in the mid-80s, I don’t know if any of them matched that year for odd pairings. The thing is I never put it together until recently that the reason for why the gig ended up this way was because only 9 days later…Live Aid happened. Reading over this thread at the Steve Hoffman forums (which I’ve hyped before) I realized that user swandown’ assertion that Page played these concerts because he was in the area preparing for Live Aid is absolutely spot on! I had a chance to go to Live Aid in Philadelphia, but I also had a chance to work overtime and didn’t think the concert was going to be that great, so I passed on it. Bad move there, eh? Aside from all of the other great music, Jimmy Page played with most of his old band. Seeing and hearing Led Zeppelin romp through Rock and Roll, Whole Lotta Love and Stairway to Heaven would’ve been better than (not) seeing Page (but hearing him) play Beach Boys hits…maybe. The thing is that Jimmy wasn’t exactly playing at his best during the mid-80s and from experience I can tell you that these super-large mega shows were always more about the party than the musical quality. Either show was a great time and I’m glad I got to see the one I did!

Flashback #2 will be Bonnie Raitt, John Fogerty and Only the Lonely.

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Online Guitar Teachers #2

Last week I started rebuilding the guitar instruction list with a couple of great jazz players / instructors. This post will focus on a few players / instructors who are more from the rock/pop world, although one guy certainly does “go there” when in comes to jazz instruction.

Carl Brown from GuitarLessons365.com is a great player and a very easy-to-follow instructor. He shows you how to play a whole lot of great songs the right way! That’s why his channel has over 400,000 subscribers! He also delves into a lot of technique and theory topics and it will definitely make you a better player! If you want to know more about Carl, here is an online interview with him.

Another channel I like a lot, especially the acoustic tutorials, is Shut Up and Play. The song selections are pretty cool, and in some cases, offbeat, and the instruction is top-notch. I (re-learned) how to play ELP’s From the Beginning by watching the above video. Great stuff and they(?) have a Facebook page here.

Finally, here is a guy who is a total pioneer in YouTube guitar instruction: Justin Sandercoe. His videos cover pretty much every guitar topic and there is a massive amount of information on his website too. Perfect for people of any skill level and all of the instruction is delivered with a really upbeat can-do attitude.

Frank Zappa Gets Hologram-ed!

Frank Zappa, the late, iconic guitarist, composer, writer, multi-media artist and outspoken personality is about to go on tour…nearly 24 years after he passed away. Last month I wrote about the Ronnie James Dio hologram and mused that it would only be a matter of time before this caught on with other “late” rock stars. Looks like that was already in the works…obviously.

One half of the Zappa Family (the Trust), which is the siblings who are not Dweezil, (and yes there is a history of disagreements there) have partnered with Eyellusion“live music’s premier hologram production company” to send Frank’s likeness on tour. What’s interesting about this company is that both Ahmet Zappa and Wendy Dio are part of Eyellusion’s “team”. Wow! That I did not expect.

Steve Vai will be joining in on a few of the Fake Frank shows, Dweezil will not. He shared his thoughts on the whole matter here. There are many related articles at that link if you want to read up on the entire affair.

Here is the official Official Ronnie James Dio Hologram Wacken Performance, you guys! It’s almost as if he is still here! Submit to the future! It’s only a matter of time before all your music will be provided by Skynet!

Online Guitar Teachers

During the big revamp of The Guitar Cave, the long list of links I had amassed was lost. I’m not really sure how I managed to do that but it’s a bummer because there were many great playing, lesson and instruction sites, and I don’t remember them all. No matter though — It will live again! Starting with this post and the beginnings of a list again in the right column.

Two online instructors who I think totally rock are Morten Faerestrand and Jens Larsen. They both have the key requirements for what I think qualifies as great YouTube instructor cred: 1) Killer guitar skills; 2) Wide variety of topics, including theory and gear; 3) Great technical presentation quality; 4) Great ideas for lessons and licks and, finally; 5) a teaching method that is clear and focused. While they are both primarily jazz players, many of their ideas for licks and tricks and explanation of theory is stuff that can be used by any player…of any style.

I feel that I’m at a point in my life where I understand and can execute many things that I want to do with the guitar, but still, it’s always nice to hear fresh perspectives. Also, I do like watching both of these guys play guitar and they always have quick ideas for licks or ways of thinking that is interesting and inspiring. Morten’s channel is here; Jens’ is here.

I’ve seen a lot of different people doing guitar instruction on Da ‘Tube and some of it is really annoying. Sorry, there is no other word for it. Not only are there a lot of people who aren’t teaching right, but they also don’t put any thought into what they are doing. Who has the patience to wade through a 25-minute video that needs bread crumbs to find it’s way home? Not me that’s for sure! This is what I like about Morten and Jens: They talk, they demonstrate, and they’re done! There are other people who I think are likewise, very good, and I will get to them soon.

Joe Meek, Telstar, and Brit Hard Rock

Back in July I wrote a post on Space Age Pop. (This was part of a ShortRiff and all of those never-to-be-repeated series are located up top in the header menu). Probably the most famous Space Age Pop song [and the most successful] was a British recording from 1962, the instrumental Telstar (named after an American satellite) performed by The Tornados. Telstar was written and produced by Joe Meek, a guy who was already legendary in Brit circles for being an independent mad scientist of a record producer/recording engineer who operated outside the bounds of the (at that time) very conservative British sound industry. Unfortunately, he was also (probably) psychotic, addicted to amphetamines, gay when it was completely illegal to be so and eventually became financially insolvent because of a debilitating suit brought against Telstar by French Composer, Jean Ledrut. The suit prevented Meek from collecting any royalties from the song during his lifetime, but ironically (?), tragically (?) the case was found in his favor three weeks after he killed his landlady and himself with a shotgun on February 3, 1967 (the anniversary of Buddy Holly’s plane crash). Other not so good things included knowing Beatles’ manager Brian Epstein, but thinking the band was “rubbish”; hanging up on Phil Spector; and thinking everyone was stealing his work (taking enough speed that one night a week of sleep suffices will do that to you).

But in his home studio, the search for his vision of a sonic ideal never abated and included: building his own gear, using cutting edge techniques like multiple overdubs, echo, delay, close-miking, direct input and compression, and generally just approaching the art of recording from whatever off-the-wall perspective he thought would bring the right sound to the record. He was fascinated by space and, in addition to Telstar, he recorded I Hear A New World a fantasy concept album about life on the moon in 1960. His fascination with the occult led him to record creepy songs, sounds in graveyards and cats “talking”. The dude was from another world.

What is really interesting for guitar players is how a couple of the future heavyweights from 60s and 70s rock were doing sessions associated with Joe Meek. This group included British Sessions guy Big Jim Sullivan, Ritchie Blackmore, Steve Howe, and Jimmy Page. Ritchie Blackmore became Meek’s first-call guitarist between 1962-65. While Page’s legacy in the studio in the early 60s is/was common knowledge, I never knew Ritchie was a session guy. He was a very happening guitarist by the time he was 18 though and he was acquainted with Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page in those early days. He was also in a band with the very colorful Screaming Lord Sutch, a horror-show-themed personality modeled after Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, who not only recorded with Joe Meek, but also was associated with some of British rock’s most famous personalities. Anyhow, this article has a laundry list description of Joe Meek’s guitar recording techniques and it’s definitely worth a read. He was a man with a passionate ear and very ahead of his time. Would not be surprised if Page learned a thing or three about recording and filed those ideas away for later when he was in that really huge band whose name escapes me at the moment.

There are many Joe Meek recordings on Youtube. Many listeners will probably find a fair amount of the music has a kitschy, lounge-y production value along with the musical weirdness that was Space Age Pop. But there was also a lot of raunchy rock and roll — You Keep a Knocking by The Outlaws (with a stinging Blackmore at 18 years of age guitar solo), Train Kept a-Rollin’ by Screaming Lord Sutch (once again with Blackmore on guitar), Have I the Right? by the Honeycombs — a band notable for having a female drummer, Honey Lantree, in 1964. They churn out a slammin’ Dave Clark 5-y single with this big hit produced by Joe Meek. As a matter of fact this song and Telstar were 2 of the 3 Number 1 songs that Joe Meek produced. There are a couple of compilations that have some great sounding stuff with great guitar work, here and here. While some of the “pop” stuff is weird and dated, I’m telling you, the songs and sound grow on you…like an evil plankton out of a Stephen King novel…one of the good ones…ya know…from a long time ago. Or… some of the tunes can sound as sappy and syrupy sweet as a can of Geisha White Peaches and believe you me — that is pretty sweet! Some of the KRAZY KUTS (especially Meek’s “concept” records and the wackiest of the Sutch and the Savages-type offerings) is like Dr. Demento-type novelty music. If you have read this blog, you know I have some experience with that genre and the twisted, silly, outrageous and sometimes flat-out dumb recording process involved. But my experiences during those years were a whole lot of fun and extremely interesting when it came to the various processes how instruments, musicians and even the entire studio can be manipulated to create otherworldly music.

In 2008 there was a film made, Telstar: The Joe Meek Story. While it looks like The Commitments—30 years later I’m sure it’s entertaining in a madcap and informative way if that’s your cup of tea. There are also some very informative documentarytype things on YouTube. I believe there was some made-for-television presentation done back in the early 1990s. There is also a NEW DOCUMENTARY coming out next month titled, A Life in the Death of Joe Meek, which should be very interesting. They have input from Page, Howe, members of The Honeycombs and The Tornados! I will be looking to see that ASAP and then report back…
So stay tuned for that!

“Under Investigation” — Guitar Player Magazine

I found a cool column courtesy of Guitar Player Magazine (online). Here’s a link to three different solos from three different players/songs (Denny Dias, Jeff “Skunk” Baxter and the recently-departed Walter Becker) associated with early Steely Dan. There is a collection of other eclectic ‘investigations’, all written by Jesse Gress, including: The Monkees, Harvey Mandel, Miles Davis, Jerry Reed, Jeff Beck, and former ace guitarist from Chicago (the band), Terry Kath. All of these lessons are pretty detailed and come with standard fret-board diagrams to make for easy learning. It’s a pretty cool series just to read too!

Guitar Player has a pretty huge library of free online instructional stuff…probably more than most people would ever get through. The sheer volume of guitar instruction online today is pretty mind-boggling, but hopefully this treasure trove of info will pay big dividends for the future of the instrument and the musical abilities of those who play it.

Walter Becker

…passed away. I wasn’t Steely Dan’s biggest fan, but Becker and his long-time partner, Donald Fagen, were very popular and influential innovators who definitely expanded the boundaries of rock and FM radio. AJA was a hit and hip album with “the kids” when I was in high school, believe it or not. Over the years they had a bunch of stuff that featured Becker on bass or guitar. Here is one of his best known guitar jams.

Ed Cherry Trio Live in NYC

This was a fun night out with friends from another part of the world! We went and saw the Ed Cherry Trio working it out at The Fat Cat in NYC. I mentioned here how much I like Grant Green’s Matador album. These guys played Green Jeans, among many other splendid jams that included Miles Davis’ Blue in Green and Horace Silver’s Nica’s Dream. The trio has that guitar-organ-drum trio sound that I really like a bunch! Fantastic! Ed’s got a very bluesy jazz guitar sound that is really cool and his comping is out of this world. I learned a few things! A very enjoyable set that also featured Kyle Kohler and Aron Seeber. Will see again!

If you ever find yourself in NYC, check out the Fat Cat! It’s a great performance space and a huge game room. They have everything from air hockey and ping pong down to chess and backgammon. And they’re open like 32 hours a day. And you can see great bands!