Archive for The Beatles

ShortRiffs — May/June 2017

Posted in Music Business, Players, ShortRiffs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 27, 2017 by theguitarcave

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Welcome to the May/June issue of ShortRiffs — the monthly column that focuses on all the guitar, music and life things going on around The Guitar Cave. I have a pretty jam-packed issue this month, including some very sad news. As always, though, thank you! for your continued patronage.

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The news about Chris Cornell was just terrible — a very sad situation. He was an extremely talented singer, writer and guitar player. I’ve been a fan for a long time. Soundgarden is some the best music to be released in the last 25 years and I spent many an hour back in the day playing those riffs with complete and utter rock abandon. That is one reason I recently profiled Soundgarden’s Head Down as a GuitarSong. The band represented everything that is GREAT about heavy and dynamic guitar rock and, of course, Chris’ talent and vision was a huge part of that heaviness. He fought bravely against the demons that populate the nightmare landscape of the mind and in the process, gave the world a whole lot of great music. I hope he has found peace.

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One of the best things about Facebook and YouTube is how easy it is to see awesome videos like classical Vietnamese guitarist Thu Le practicing. She takes “relax while you practice” to a whole new level! People all over the world are fanatical about playing guitar and reaching high levels of ability and achievement! Isn’t that great? I think it’s fantastic. Classical guitar played well just doesn’t sound like anything else! Since graduating from the Hanoi National Conservatory of Music in 2001 Thu has become an internationally acclaimed artist. She has lots of great videos on YouTube and I’ll be looking for her to keep bringing her \m/ classical riffing to the masses!

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Last year I wrote a post on Barney Kessel and I have his Yesterday album reviewed in the right column on the blog’s main page. Though this disc has been a long-time favorite of mine, recently I went on a daily listening jag and, in the process, learned most of his licks from the Beatles’ cover Yesterday, the namesake of the disc. I’ve also been playing through his cover of Old Devil Moon. In addition to the Yesterday licks from Barney’s version, I have also been incorporating licks from another version I found on YouTube from Helmut Kagerer. I have no idea if he based his version on Barney Kessel, but it’s close enough for me! Solo Yesterday is absolutely a fun little piece to play once you start getting it under your fingers. Here is the Barney recording on YouTube and Helmut’s is below. Below that is a nice little run through of the head and a chorus or two of Old Devil Moon by a gent named Alessio Menconi. Very nicely done. Great feel and sound on the solo! So if you ever have a desire to play either of these songs, this will get you started for sure!

And furthermore…HERE is a podcast of Barney solo guitar that was recorded in a restaurant in the early 1980s with just a few people hanging out. Barney also cracks jokes and shares his philosophy on life and guitar. The audio isn’t great, but a really cool find and some great solo playing!

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Speaking of Barney Kessel, here he is with two other jazz guitar monsters — Kenny Burrell and the one and only Grant Green. I think these are the only videos online of Grant Green playing live so they’re pretty meaninful. Kenny and Barney are both fantastic players and they have a HUGE presence on “The Tube“. I found myself wondering the other night how many gigs did Barney play with that Gibson ES-350 of his? In case you didn’t see, here he is talking about it.

Back to Grant Green though…I have his Matador and Standards discs. I have been listening to the Matador disc quite a bit recently. Green is not your typical jazz guitarist; some would probably his soul/funky blues lines too rudimentary or limited in a real jazz setting and there are definitely times on the Matador disc when McCoy Tyner almost overwhelms because of Tyner’s ability to dazzle with his piano chops and bend the harmonies of all the tunes in so many different directions. Green is a very rhythmic guitarist and makes great use of time and space, does not employ many chromatic lines and uses repeat figures as motifs in all of the tunes. The end result is a very modal, angular improvisation that is beautifully articulated on all tracks. His sound was a very mid-range; part Charlie Christian, part blues, achieved by using a Gibson 330, a Fender Twin (at times) and, doing this (Barney Kessel had a similar sound). The Matador album also features the great Elvin Jones on drums, and Bob Cranshaw on bass and along with the aforementioned McCoy Tyner. All of these guys are jazz legends and the ensemble sound is great! Featured is Green’s low-down version of My Favorite Things, which, at the time, (early 60s) was John Coltrane‘s song. (His recording also featured Tyner and Jones). Other tracks include the righteous 11+ minute workout Bedouin, the chitlins-circuit style cut Green Jeans and funky-jazz title cut, which evokes all of the atmosphere of a smoky, early 60s jazz club. This is a hot quartet firing on all cylinders believe you me and I love the SOUND of these early 60s records. Totally cool!

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BonaFide Rock Legend Greg Allman of The Allman Brothers has also passed away. Damn! My blog is turning into the Blog of Death or something…I’ve written on the Brothers a few times — pretty much everyone from my generation was influenced or at least heavily aware of the musical greatness of this band and all of the people associated with it. The earliest musical jamming situations I was in were influenced by The Allman Brothers and One Way Out is one of the first songs I played a good solo on. Greg and his very influential brother, Duane, along with Dicky Betts, Butch Trucks (who died in January), Berry Oakley and Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson created a few new styles of rock and in the process became one of the most important American bands to come out of the riotous 1960s. As I wrote in GuitarSong #3 the Brothers music still (and will always) have the power to move people. I witnessed this myself not that long ago. The fusion of different musical styles and elements that became the foundation of ABB’s music is so transcendent, and such an important part of the American music fabric.

Over the years so many other great players, including Warren Haynes, Derek Trucks, and Allen Woody helped continue the ever-evolving musical sojourn / road trip that was The Allman Brothers. While Gregg was known mostly as the band’s lead vocalist and B3 organ player, he did play guitar and wrote quite a few tunes on guitar, including the mega-classic, Melissa. While he had been in ill-health lately, some years before he had successfully purged himself of the substance demons that had dogged him for most of his life. He died peacefully at home and hopefully…fully aware of the amazing legacy that he has left in his wake.

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I follow Denis Chang (who I’ve written about here, here, and here) on Facebook and not only is he a great musician and savvy businessman, but his knowledge of music and transcription is impressively effin’ BOSS if you ask me. This video is an educational demo of the finer points of transcribing some tricky stuff from jazz legend Pat Martino using the Sibelius app. Denis and his crew crank out a mega-load of musical excellence every year and you can peruse the very fine DC Music School catalog here.

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My sister gave me this book, Dreaming the Beatles, a new take on the Fab Four, written by Rolling Stone reviewer and author of other stuff, Rob Sheffield. While I do enjoy reading about the Beatles’ music, I should’ve avoided this one, but it was a gift and…I was trying to keep an open mind. I imagine people who aren’t musicians or people who like reading about pop culture will like this more than I did, but I’m just speculating. The point of the book, as described on the Amazon page:

…is a collection of essays telling the story of what this ubiquitous band means to a generation who grew up with the Beatles music on their parents’ stereos and their faces on T-shirts. What do the Beatles mean today? Why are they more famous and beloved now than ever? And why do they still matter so much to us, nearly fifty years after they broke up?

None of these questions really interest me and this is the type of book where you either like the author or you don’t and if you don’t, you won’t like the book because the author is a major part of the story. Which sucks. Because I wanted to read about the Beatles. I honestly can’t tell if the book is a gigantic troll-job or if the author is looking for his own talk show or a kaffeeklatch with Oprah. He’s way too emo for me. He spends an inordinate amount of time talking about himself and how he relates to the Beatles and then tries to insinuate this is how all people relate to the Beatles…or should. (This is the methodology of how we are supposed to arrive at the answers to the questions the book poses). At times his anecdotes in this regard veer completely off the rails, like this example from a chapter titled, The Scream:

When I listen to Hollywood Bowl, I do not imagine being one of the Beatles; I fantasize about being a girl in the upper-balcony cheap seats, ripping out my hair and shrieking, tapping into the eternal gnosis that not even the boys in the band could ever know.

See what I mean about being too emo? I’m not sure why a guy in his 50s (as the author is) would be fantasizing about shrieking like a teenage girl. In 40+ years of listening to the Beatles, playing Beatles music for people, and knowing other Beatles’ fans I have never heard anyone, male or female, of any age, express similar sentiments. The above sentence is prefaced by another doozy: any fan who claims they don’t share this desire has to be lying. Whatever. The author also attempts rewrite Beatles’ history and/or interpret Beatles lyrics in the same out-of-left-field manner, sometimes with truly bizarre results. Like this little gem about the songs My Love and Something.

“Something” became George’s greatest hit, as well as the one that made John and Paul most jealous. It was the first time the Quiet One got the A-side of a single. Oh, how it must have burned Paul that he didn’t write this song. And that’s how “My Love” happened. (page 207)

There is no evidence to suggest that Paul McCartney’s My Love was anything but a heartfelt paean to his wife, Linda, but because Sheffield thinks My Love is the worst song (not even close) in the Beatles’/post-Beatles’ catalog he constructs this elaborate conspiracy theory that would make Alex Jones proud. What’s interesting is My Love was a bigger hit and was the #5 song for 1973. I’m not sure how a song that spent a month at #1 qualifies as the worst Beatle/post-Beatle song in any rational person’s universe.

There are many moments like this scattered throughout the book and it’s annoying. I can’t recommend the book and I don’t have the patience for this kind of music writing anymore because I can never completely suspend that inner voice that is telling me I’m being gamed.

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While we’re on the subject of the Beatles: Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band turns 50 this month. Of course a whole new package has been rolled out to commemorate the occasion, including a complete remix done by Giles Martin (son of George Martin). Here is an interview where he explains the process. I imagine the record sounds a lot different now; back in the day they had to bounce so many tracks down to just a few (I believe the original album was done on 4 tracks) so the sound panorama now is a lot more vivid. It must be an interesting listening experience. I have never liked Pepper as much as the earlier Beatles stuff, but I do think it was the last great Beatles’ record. I don’t know that I really need to hear an updated version though.

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Here is a fascinating clip — the original lineup of The Byrds, playing live on The Big T.N.T Show in late 1965. This performance captures all of the fantastic weirdness of this band and how amazing it is that they are always (rightfully) considered as possible candidates for best American band of all time. They influenced the Beatles, REM, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, The Eagles, The Smiths and many more. While they would go through many lineup changes and musical permutations, this is the classic group: Jim “Roger” McGuinn, David Crosby, Gene Clark, Chris Hillman and Michael Clark. Often described as one of the most dysfunctional bands ever, they were only together for less than two years before things started falling apart. But by then their legacy was assured because of their unique sound.

Of course a very important component is the Roger McGuinn guitar sound — achieved with the 12-string Rickenbacker. Here is his explanation of how important compression was for the recording of his guitar sound. The ringing and very chiming effect can be many things simultaneously and over the course of the Byrds career it was; veering from early psychedelia and folk rock to jazz (Eight Miles High) and raga rock (Why) to country and country rock. He was already a very accomplished guitarist at this point and it didn’t hurt that he drew inspiration from a wide circle of influences. McGuinn, Gene Clark and David Crosby harmonized very well together, but there was a raggedness about the band that recalls the lo-fi brilliance of the Velvet Underground. Michael Clark, by all accounts didn’t really play drums like a drummer, but in the vein of Keith Moon of The Who or Moe Tucker of The Velvet Underground; he made a rhythmic noise (that you can see people responding to in the clip). It’s not exactly your standard fare rock and roll of the time though. Crosby has stated that he and Hillman had to adapt their rhythms to fill in the gaps where the drums should have been, so of course this throws the music into a completely different thing from most bands:

Well the drummer couldn’t play…never could. He looked right but he never was a very good drummer, he was a nice guy. That’s one of the reasons I learned to play that chop and smack kind of rhythm because I had to learn how to play drums on the guitar. Somebody had to do and so it was me and Chris.

— David Crosby – Musicangle 2004

Even though the Byrds would develop into pretty good songwriters, and their music would evolve into many things, the band hadn’t really come into its own at the time of this performance and the limitations are evident. There are 3 songs and all three are covers; Mr. Tambourine Man was written by Bob Dylan, The Bells of Rhymney and Turn, Turn Turn were both adapted to song by Pete Seeger. All three songs are “folk” songs. All three songs are in the key of D major. All three are are about the same tempo (right around 110-114 bpm). McGuinn’s guitar, the somber lyric content, the close 3-part harmony, the tempo and their rhythmic chops give the whole performance a very druggy, out of focus sixties feel. McGuinn really was the original Stonerrocker, although I’m sure he wouldn’t appreciate that characterization. 1965 was a pivotal year for rock and pop growing up and getting serious — The Beatles were recording Rubber Soul when this show was filmed. Of course the folkishness doesn’t stop the teenyboppers from having a good time. I’m sure they wanted to rock, or at least pop! like Beatlemania.

As I said above, Pete Seeger set the Idris Davies poem about a Wales mine disaster and General Strike to music and the verses of the Gwalia Deserta became the song The Bells of Rhymney. Pete was a giant of folk music; a spiritual presence who was an intense part of the American music fabric for almost 70 years. While he may be known more for the banjo and more subdued accompaniment, the above clip demonstrates that he knew how to get down on the old guitar too. That’s a pretty hot performance I think. It reminds me of what I talked about in these two posts about how interesting that coffeehouse sound of the 50s and 60s was. You have a wide range of artists and real happening guitar players like Davey Graham, Paul Simon, Charlie Byrd, Pete Seeger, Jerry Garcia, Roger McGuinn, David Crosby, and many more in various US and British cities who came up or got their start playing some semblance of folk or roots music in these small wine and coffee places. Folk, skiffle, jazz, blues, latin, and country all overlapped with some very interesting permutations. The Byrds took that all one step further into the pop, rock, acid rock, raga rock and country rock categories as their career went along. But it all kind of starts on an acoustic guitar, doesn’t it? Speaking of which, here’s another guy playing the blanky-blank out of The Bells of Rhymney. Great performance by John Denver — another very famous guitar guy from the folk / coffeehouse or cafehaus school of getting down on a 6-string.

Christmas Time is Here — Part II

Posted in Education, Players, Playing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2017 by theguitarcave

So in Part I of Christmas Time is Here I briefly described some of the history of Christmas carols and popular holiday songs with the idea in mind that as musicians we are sometimes called to play them and shouldn’t shy away from playing them or enjoying the rich history and tradition they symbolize. In this post I will cover actually moving on to making these songs a part of repertoire. The first step in that direction is, of course, deciding on, and building up an arrangement of a song that you like, that works with your abilities as a musician, and will fit the performance you are going to give. This can be an arrangement you learn or one you adapt from either a vocal or instrumental arrangement that is already out there. Every musical number I do, Christmas song or not, even if it is based on someone’s version of a song, I like to change it a little bit or add something to it. That is just a way of personalizing the music or performance and jazz musicians especially do this all of the time.

If you are inclined to a the classic era of Big Band and vocal performances, you can never go wrong with any of the masters from the Golden Age of jazz and pop: Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Ella Fitzgerald, Sammy Davis Jr., Nat King Cole, Tony Bennett, and Bing Crosby to name a few. Their interpretations of holiday music are still heard regularly today — I heard Nat King Cole’s The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting…) in 3 different stores during the buildup to 12/25 this year. The arrangements are usually pretty involved but they are also accessible and can be very inspiring in what you add to the song or (if you also sing) how your vocal arrangement will sound.

Speaking of Chestnuts and roasting on an open fire… We’ve all heard Nat King Cole or someone else sing this song, but how many people have actually seen a chestnut? Have you ever wondered about that? There was a time when chestnut trees were almost 25% of all hardwood stock in some areas of North America and recipes for everything from roasted chestnuts to chestnuts and sausages were typical fare. But a blight, introduced by planting a strain of Asian chestnuts in Long Island, NY in 1904 wiped out literally billions of trees. That’s right, Billions! It’s estimated there are only a few dozen pre-blight trees still alive in North America today and, of course, hardly anyone eats chestnuts during the holidays and almost all of the chestnuts that are eaten have to be imported. By the time The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting…) was written in 1944, most of the nation’s chestnut tree stock had already been wiped out. What an ecological nightmare! The things I learn blogging sometimes.

Many great instrumentalists from the 40s, 50s and 60s made holiday albums: Oscar Peterson, Count Basie, George Shearing, Joe Pass, Charlie Byrd all made Christmas albums. So did swinging 60s style artists like Herb Albert, and so have newer jazzy/poppy superstars like Wynton Marsalis, Diane Krall and Nancy Wilson. There are literally weeks worth of instrumental and mood-type Christmas music on YouTube and possibly something on one of these albums could inspire you in a certain direction.

Some people may be more inclined to the rock and roll side of things but keep in mind that the lines of where Golden Classics leave off and rock and roll begins is a fine one indeed. Elvis Presley recorded a whole bunch of Christmas music and his tastes range from gospel, to rock and roll to straight pop. His interpretations of the classics (I’ll Be Home For Christmas, Little Town of Bethlehem) are as good as anyone’s because his gospel background and religious convictions give such sacred songs a depth that many secular vocalists just don’t do as well. It’s very easy to reduce a whole lot of the religious holiday music to camp and sentimentality, but Elvis never does this. He also recorded the definitive version of Blue Christmas. On the original version his vocals are awesome and the arrangement, including the background vocals by The Jordanaires, was inspiring and musically groundbreaking for the time. Was this the first rock and roll Christmas Song? Hmm. Maybe someone more knowledgeable than I will chime in. Of course there was a whole lot of rock and roll Christmas after 1957 including: Chuck Berry, The Ventures, Phil Spector’s Christmas (including The Ronettes’ version of Sleigh Ride, which is also a classic), The Beatles, who released lots of Christmas craziness through their fan club and then later, John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s So This Is Christmas and Paul McCartney’s Wonderful Christmas Time, both of which still get HEAVY airplay during the season. They are modern standards for sure. The Boss, Bruce Springsteen, also has a modern standard with his version of Santa Claus is Coming to Town, which has also been covered by everyone from Mariah to Bieber. José Feliciano, who I wrote about here, has the awesome Felice Navidad song that still gets yearly airplay and the recently-departed George Michael had a big 80s classic hit with the holiday favorite Last Christmas. Back in 1992 I was lucky enough to catch the Johnny Cash Christmas show when it rolled through New York City. That was a lot of fun. Brian Setzer has had a Christmas show/revue for years and he has covered a whole ton of great songs. Like this one:

So, depending on your preferred style of music, you can adapt and arrange any song you see fit and spice up everything from musical performances to family gatherings. Christmas songs, carols and melodies lend themselves to a wide variety of possibilities; they can have a very bare bones arrangement that you may sing along with, or they also can be turned into an instrumental mind-blower like what the always amazing Ted Greene does below. When I was in a punk band we used to do a twisted, Black Sabbath kind of take on Santa Claus is Coming to Town. When I got old and settled down, Christmas Time is Here was the first Christmas song I learned to play as a solo improviser and I have played it every year since and performed it at numerous gigs. This past year I worked up an arrangement that was based on The Ventures version of Sleigh Ride and tweaked it to work with gypsy jazz, rehearsed a couple times with the fellows, and away we went at a gig 4 days before Christmas. It was one of the best songs of the gig(!) even though no one had either a vibrato bar or copious amounts of delay since we were playing amplified acoustic. As always: If you are playing the songs instrumentally MAKE SURE you can play the melody without screwing it up! That means going over it a bunch of times. You should be able to play it 3-5 times in a row without a mistake. If you can’t, you will probably fudge it at the gig or in front of people. So beware!

There are about 7-8 songs that I can play pretty well solo and I start getting them together in the fall and play them through the season. Christmas songs are great vehicles for learning to play in an unaccompanied style (especially if you are new to unaccompanied playing), because the melodies are so well-known and the arrangement you can begin with can be very simple, but still very effective. As always take it slow and work your way through it a couple bars at a time. Since most songs do not have many different parts or modulations (unless you add them, which you can certainly do!) you will find that they will come together pretty quickly. Learning to play and perform these tunes is also a great test of what you can add to the performance every time you play it once you become comfortable improvising with yourself. I blew off a version of White Christmas while a few of us were sitting around one day in December and it sounded pretty flippin’ good! If you’re comfortable with the arrangement and comfortable improvising (throwing in some wacky chords and riff choices) you can turn the song into a really special and personal thing…and it can be a little bit different every time! So maybe give that a go later on in the year. Here is a list of jazzy, snazzy solo guitar instruction to get you started. If you’re not up to that yet, try these. You will become part of a long and very storied and important tradition that has involved the guitar and other string instruments for the better part of a millennium. Even if you play in a punk or metal band — everyone likes Christmas songs if you play them well and it’s November or December. Whatever you do, don’t even try this in July man!

GuitarSong #4

Posted in Education, Guitar Songs, Players, Playing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 14, 2016 by theguitarcave

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The fourth installment of the GuitarSong series profiles Soundgarden and their very trippy song Head Down from the 1994 Superunknown album. Their best selling disc, Superunknown followed the band’s breakout hit Badmotorfinger, was a success critically and commercially, and is still regarded as one of Grunge Rock’s defining records (along with Nevermind, Ten and Dirt)

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Way back in the 80s Soundgarden was formed in Seattle and came of age and ability around the same time as many other well-known bands from that legendary scene: Tad, Skin Yard, Green River, Mudhoney, Nirvana. Like the other Seattle rock denizens, Soundgarden was influenced by equal parts punk rock, rock, pop and metal-ish bands like Black Sabbath. In the early days they were very crude and their riffs were big and huge, but in 1991 Ben Shepherd joined the band on bass guitar and brought with him a whole new approach for writing and recording. Coincidentally, around the same time singer/guitarist Chris Cornell really started to come into his own as a songwriter and these two events completely redefined the Soundgarden sound. By the time Superunknown was recorded many of the rough edges had been polished, the songs were more sophisticated and the sounds much improved. In essence, amid all of the heaviness, they created a modern-day Revolver with plenty of melodic Beatle-esque moments, including this tune.

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While Kim Thayil, lead guitarist of Soundgarden, was responsible for some of the heaviest riffing from the early 90s, Chris Cornell is also no slouch as a guitarist and has written and played some of the best guitar the band has produced. One of the key ingredients that bassist Ben Shepherd brought to the band was an interest in open guitar tunings and the ability to write a good guitar song and though he wrote the music and lyrics to Head Down he plays bass on the song. So I would imagine it was very much a group effort to get Head Down together, with everyone, including drummer Matt Cameron, putting in a solid effort. As Chris Cornell was quoted as saying:

“Head Down” was a complete demo Ben had played for me, where he’s singing on it and it’s very similar to what ended up on the record. That was an amazing moment because it was one of those times when I felt like, “This must be what it was like to be in the Beatles,” where one of the band members just walks in and drops a song like that ­— it’s already done and you don’t have to do anything, and you already know it’s going to be one of the best songs on the album.

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First — tuning for the song is CGCGGE. This jangly, somewhat psychedelic, Zepplin-y tuning is also used on the great tune, Burden in My Hand from the Down on the Upside album. The great thing about this tuning is that it has a drone type sound on (what would normally be) the D through the high E strings, but the low (what would normally be) E and A strings function as the power sound of a dropped-D tuning. So you can have these very jingly-jangly, bluesy, psychedelic high riffs and melodies and combine that with a very heavy bottom riff all on the same tuning! Also the “dropped” nature of the top strings means those riffs can be played with one finger and given that the tuning is C based and the song is in the key of C, the open/12th fret dynamic applies (as it would if you were in concert tuning and playing in E).

As you can see from videos, Cornell begins the song with a clean sound and Thayil reinforces the riffs with a more overdriven guitar sound. Then they just build it up to POUND level it until the middle. Interestingly, tuning to C was/is a favorite technique of Stoner Rock bands (Kyuss, Monster Magnet, Acid King, High On Fire) because the riffs be so HEAVY and simultaneously it is a lot easier on the vocalist as it is two steps down from concert tuning. The other aspect is the de-tuned treble strings have a slurry/jangly sound that is pretty great; definitely not suited for everything, but on a tune like this, it works! After one of Soundgarden’s patented “big” riffs (minute 2:50) Thayil, Cornell and Shepherd all play counter melodies in the middle before returning to the main riff. The band wasn’t really known for this kind of dynamic jamming, but they look like they’re having fun and that’s one reason why I picked it as a GuitarSong. I’ve never played Head Down in a band situation, but I have played it myself and it’s a fun tune to play! It’s also a good beginner to intermediate style song and you can certainly take it a lot of places because the tuning and structure have that “openness” that allows for experimentation.

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Here is the midi-tab for Head Down.

Here‘s a list of the song’s YouTube play-a-longs.

Here‘s a cool interview with the band.

Here is the Unofficial Soundgarden Page. I used to visit back in the day and it’s still online. It is very informative and it has a guitar tab section that is pretty good.

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Soundgarden was one of my favorite bands from the 90s and I think Superunknown is one of the best albums of the past 25 years. There are certainly many tunes off of the disc that one could pick as a great guitar song because it’s full of great moments. As I said earlier, I think Head Down is a really good “learner” tune for those who don’t have the abililty yet to play some of the more difficult stuff and also it’s a song that can be played just as easily on acoustic or electric. It also gets one in shape to deal with open tunings, which as I have written about in the past, is a great way to expand your guitar abilities and also broaden your songwriting. Once you are comfortable in this tuning you can proceed directly to Burden in My Hand. Some of the other open tunings are easier (My Wave, The Day I Tried to Live) some are a bit more esoteric (4th of July, Like Suicide, Mailman). But once you are comfortable you can navigate easily and maybe even make up some of your own. That’s what they did!

GuitarSong #2

Posted in Education, Equipment, Guitar Songs, Players with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 30, 2016 by theguitarcave

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The second installment of the new GuitarSong series profiles The Beatles and their wonderful song Rain from 1966. Rain was a milestone recording for the band and the development of music as it was the first instance of anything recorded backwards, (John Lennon’s vocals) beating the B-side of the novelty tune single They’re Coming To Take Me Away Haa Haa by two months. While Rain certainly isn’t as long and involved as the first GuitarSong, Dogs, it is cool song to explore. Unfortunately, the only online version currently is this too fast 45 rpm video. Hopefully, you have a legal copy somewhere to listen to.

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Known through history as The Beatles finest b-side, (the a-side was Paperback Writer) Rain was written and recorded in early April of 1966. Recording for the Revolver album had just commenced at the same time with Tomorrow Never Knows (the first song to be recorded for the album) getting basic tracking on April 6 and 7. Rain was recorded a week later on the 14th and 16th. While it has always been taken as a given that Rain was mostly the brainchild of John Lennon (with Paperback Writer being more a McCartney composition), Paul doesn’t agree with that assessment:

I don’t think he brought the original idea, just when we sat down to write, he kicked it off. Songs have traditionally treated rain as a bad thing and what we got on to was that it’s no bad thing. There’s no greater feeling than the rain dripping down your back. The most interesting thing about it wasn’t the writing, which was tilted 70-30 to John, but the recording of it.

Paul McCartney — Many Years From Now, Barry Miles

That last little cryptic mention of the “recording” of it is very interesting and is going to come into play further down the post with regards as to who did what on the track.

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While conventional wisdom would say that George Harrison was the lead or main guitarist on this song, that cannot be taken as a given. Lennon, McCartney and Harrison all played the lead or main guitar on songs throughout the Beatles’ career. It was Lennon who came up with and played the riff to the 1964 hit I Feel Fine, it was McCartney who played the screaming lead on Harrison’s song Taxman that kicks off the Revolver album and, of course, George played lead guitar on many songs. He and Paul doubled the very intricate lines of Lennon’s And Your Bird Can Sing that is also on the Revolver album. According to most sources, Harrison and Lennon play the guitars on this song, but there is an alternative possibility that I think is very interesting given the McCartney quote about how the song was recorded.
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The song was originally recorded faster than what is heard on the disc and then it was slowed down. This changed the texture of the song and gave it a very druggy (rainy) kind of sound. There are many (including Ringo himself) who believe this is one of Starr’s best performances as a drummer and McCartney’s bass is also very prominent in the mix because he is playing a Rickenbacker instead of the usual Hofner and it was boosted further “by using a loudspeaker as a microphone” (Lewisohn, p.88). While it is usually listed that Lennon played his 1965 Gretsch Nashville and Harrison played a Gibson SG, Galeazzo Frudua, the man behind The Beatles Vocal Harmony YouTube channel, references the book Recording the Beatles and says that not only was Paul McCartney the lead guitar player, he was also the creative drive behind the whole sound of the song! This claim is also made in the comment thread for Rain at the Beatles Bible site.

There are two guitars — detuned; Lennon’s guitar strings are dropped a whole step and McCartney’s tuned to a G drone of GDGGBD. Lennon played A-D-E shapes and since the guitar was detuned it sounds a G pitch, which is the key of the song (although it is a bit off pitch because of the sped up/slowed down basic tracks). While John strums a classic rhythm pulse for the song, Paul plays more of a droning and picking part that complements not only Lennon’s guitar, but also what Paul plays on bass.

Did George Harrison play on this tune? I don’t have the book referenced by Mr. Frudua and he doesn’t say whether George played or not. I think that maybe there is a 3rd guitar in the mix at times, but in the video referenced below it looks possible to cover everything with the two guitars. But if that’s true I’m not sure why George is listed in many places as playing an SG? It could be that he did play with the rest of the band on the original takes (when they played it faster) and then after the tapes were slowed down, McCartney overdubbed the drone G guitar. It would make more sense that Paul would’ve played bass on basic tracks with Ringo rather than overdubbing, especially given the bass/drum break near the end of the song. So possibly there is a Harrison guitar leftover from the basic takes on there somewhere. The very famous Mark Lewisohn book, The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions makes no mention of him not being at the session, so I imagine he played something. The session entry for April 16th 1966 is that eleven hours was spent completing Rain, including “doing a tape-to-tape reduction to add more overdubs” That might mean that the real idea to transform the song came after the basics had already been laid down. How many actual guitar parts are on the track though is still a bit of a mystery.

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Here is the only link you will need if you want to learn how to play Rain correctly on guitar. The Beatles Vocal Harmony YouTube channel is a one stop source for everything Beatles — singing or playing many of their classic songs. Here is the link for singing Rain‘s vocal parts.

For general info, it is always fun to check out The Beatles Bible. Not only do they cover all of the band’s songs, but there are articles on Beatles’ history that never fail to interest and entertain.

Another of my favorite forum sites to peruse is Steve Hoffman Music Forums. Here is the search list devoted to Rain/Revolver.

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I’ve referenced this period in Beatles’ history before, most recently with the post on Eastern music. Rain certainly has elements of that kind of exotic sound in the guitars, the drums, the slurry feel of the vocals in the “choruses” and Lennon’s reversed vocals at the end sound almost like an Indian Shehnai. Rain is one of the few Beatles tunes with a guitar in an open tuning (here is a discussion on Beatles’ tunings/capoes) and while it certainly isn’t a difficult song to play, it is an interesting study in using the guitar and some very fevered imagination to create a pop masterpiece. When one considers that Paperback Writer, with it’s awesome guitar riff (also played by Paul), driving rhythm and trippy vocals was the A-side of this single, and was clearly a McCartney creation, we have a really definitive 1966 guitar record from Sir Paul! Paperback Writer was recorded on April 13 and 14 of 1966, so in the space of 3 days the band had recorded both sides of one of the best double singles ever. Pretty impressive and they don’t make ’em like this anymore!

Glen Campbell — Guitar Legend

Posted in Equipment, Music Business, Players with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 31, 2016 by theguitarcave

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I recently watched two clips on YouTube that profiled Glen Campbell: singer, guitarist, actor, American TV personality. The first was his Behind The Music special from 1999 and the second was 2012 a CBS News Sunday Morning that was Glen saying Goodbye. He had recently made public his Alzheimer’s diagnosis and accepted the inevitable by releasing an album and doing a final tour. Today Glen is in the final stages of the illness at a care facility near his home in Tennessee. He had a very prolific entertainment career and remains one of America’s most popular stars. His stratospheric rise in the late 60s to the top of the pop and country charts, his popularity with American television audiences, boyish good looks and wide array of talents guaranteed he would remain in the public eye even after the big hits stopped coming. His loss is kind of personal because he reminds me of my parents and my days as a child. I can remember watching his show on television while my mother ironed or read stories to my younger sister. His variety show and shows like Star Trek, Gilligan’s Island and The Monkees were all 1st run things for me — I saw them as they happened and it’s pretty wild to think now how long ago that was.

Glen Campbell’s career began very early — by 1954, before he was 20 years old — he was already playing in bands and appearing on local radio in New Mexico. He learned to play as a youth and always credited his Uncle Boo with teaching him in the early days. Life as the son of a sharecropper in Arkansas wasn’t easy, but a way out appeared very early on when his father bought the family a Sears and Roebuck guitar. Because the action was so high, a crude capo was fashioned out of an inner tube and from then on Glen would always be a prodigious user of capos, and obviously a prodigious player of guitars. Eventually he would make his way to Los Angeles and become, by the early 60s, a very in-demand session guitar player.

While it is pretty common knowledge now, many people who became Glen Campbell fans at the end of the 1960s had no idea of Glen’s early history as a session guitarist or his association with a group of people who would later come to be known as The Wrecking Crew; a collection of the finest session musicians on the west coast. As a session musician, Glen is estimated to be on anywhere from “high-hundreds” to “a thousand” recordings — everyone from Dean Martin to Sonny and Cher, Simon and Garfunkel, The Champs, The Mamas and the Papas, Nat King Cole, scores of garage-y guitar type groups and even Ol’ Blue Eyes himself, Frank Sinatra. There are many resources dealing with Glen and The Wrecking Crew and this makes for fascinating reading.

Other guitarists associated with this group of people who were also known as “The Clique” included Barney Kessel, Howard Roberts, Al Casey and James Burton. Carol Kaye, the first lady of bass guitar also has recollections and information on her site and in an interview here. As she points out, The Wrecking Crew wasn’t really known by that name at the time and there were a lot (50-60) people involved — all of the best session players in Los Angeles at the time…and Glen Campbell was one of them. From the UNOFFICIAL MARTIN GUITAR FORUM here is a funny aside:

Interviewed Glen Campbell once and he recounted a great story about the `Strangers In The Night‘ session.

He got a late call asking if he could do a session next day because the producer needed several acoustic guitars on the track and they were one short. Glen arrived next day all sun tanned, long flowing mane, jeans, boots and Beach Boys-type shirt to find that Sinatra’s musos were all jazz players with short hair, button-down shirts, neckties and slacks. They eyed him disdainfully.

The guitar players were seated in a line with Glen on the very end and the orchestra rehearsed all day long to get the desired sound. Early evening they got the call that Frank was on his way and the tension in the studio mounted. Thirty minutes later Sinatra arrived and went straight to the control booth and the musos all craned to catch sight of `The Gov’nor’

Sinatra walked out into the studio and the orchestra spontaneously rose and applauded him. Suddenly Frank looked over at Glen and yelled to the MD `Get rid of that long haired faggot on the end! Campbell rose to his feat and made ready to leave only to find Sinatra standing directly in front of him challenging `can you really play that thing?’ GC sat down and played some really tasty licks and Sinatra said `Okay, you can stay’.

After the session Sinatra sought Campbell out, stuck a wad of $$$ in his shirt pocket and invited him to a party at his Palm Springs home.

I’m not sure I believe this story totally. Strangers in the Night was cut in 1966 and Campbell I don’t think had a “long, flowing mane” until the 70s. Still… a fun piece of 60s music lore. The fact that Glen was a part of this group of LA session players that included Barney Kessel, James Burton, Howard Roberts and the Session King, Tommy Tedesco was a testament to his guitar talents, his work ethic and his ability to get along well with others. Also, in a short time, he would be one of a few emerging talents [Roy Clark (who is in this post) being another] who could sing like a bird and play the hell out of the guitar.

One band that Glen did a whole lot of work for, and even joined for a time, was The Beach Boys. The rock and roll sound of the BBs and similar acts like Jan and Dean was right up Glen’s alley and he looked and sounded the part. Some of his session playing (Dance, Dance, Dance) survived through release, some (rock and roll intro to Fun, Fun, Fun) was most likely redone by one of the “Boys”, although it is probably impossible to know for sure anymore. In December of 1964 he filled in for Brian Wilson, who had driven himself crazy with work and too many commitments. Glen was a Beach Boy until mid-1965 when Bruce Johnson took over as a “live” Beach Boy. Also at this time The Astounding 12-String Guitar of Glen Campbell album was released to very little fanfare, but it provides some interesting aural insights into Glen’s musical background. He was already a skilled picker capable of bringing his Arkansas blues, country and early rock and roll licks tastefully to any song. Probably this album was released to try and capitalize on the very popular folk boom at the time. In 1965 The Big Bad Rock Guitar of Glen Campbell was released and sounds like it could have been put together between Wrecking Crew sessions. Great versions of Walk Don’t Run, Ticket to Ride, James Bond Theme, It’s Not Unusual and other pop hits of the day. I like this album much better and like the swinging 60s pop sound from this period. While Glen doesn’t step out into jazz improv on these numbers, his guitar is certainly great as the melody instrument and all of his fills and soloing are pretty cool too! Below he sings and plays a little on a Teisco T-60.

In the early-mid 1960s most of the popular/rock and roll production values of the LA scene imitated in a fashion the Phil Spector Wall of Sound. Here is Simon and Garfunkel’s Blessed as it appeared on the 1965 Sounds of Silence album. This was a hastily-cut record after the initial success of The Sounds of Silence single had garnered some airplay as an acoustic song and was then remixed without Simon and Garfunkel’s knowledge or input as a post-Dylan electric folk-rock number. Here is Simon and Garfunkel doing Blessed as an acoustic number live in 1967. Sounds de-tuned and in drop-D tuning, but still captures the various guitar parts of the original. Notice all of the echo on the studio version; you can really hear it on the drums in the outro. The studio recording has at least 3-4 guitar parts I can hear and there are some cool delay/comb filter-type effects too. This album was produced by Bob Johnson, who produced Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisted and albums by Johnny Cash and Leonard Cohen. Not really sure if Blessed was recorded in Nashville or LA, but Glen Campbell is listed on the credits for the album. This production is also very reminiscent of The Byrds and The Beatles mid-60s “folk-rock”. Rubber Soul was released a few weeks before this song was recorded.

On the Mike Nesmith/Monkees song Mary, Mary, a fun, but silly basic rock and roll song if there ever was one, there are 6 guitar players listed: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, Michael Deasy, and Don Peake. Holy Cow…the Stones could’ve done this without overdubs! Maybe this was another reason the session work dried up, because you know all these guys are billing for the session. It’s the music equivalent of the mafia no-show construction jobs! By the end of the decade this production style would be out of fashion, technology would grow by leaps and bounds, many artists wrested control for their projects away from producers and many bands were capable of playing all of their instruments. But here’s Glen talking about his time as a session guitarist and demonstrating guitar techniques with Craig Kilborn, including his love and use of the capo.

As he recounts in Behind the Music, he did so many sessions he bought a car and had money to burn. After two disaster gigs opening solo for The Doors (wow!) he related that he didn’t go out on the road again until after his television show was a hit. Session work was more rewarding and enjoyable. When I first began playing guitar, I used to read Guitar Player magazine, which featured a regular column with premier session guitarist, Tommy Tedesco. It was always fun to read what Tommy was up to — whether it was a Bop gig, a new television show theme, a movie soundtrack. He would also list the other players, what instruments he used and how much money he made from the session. It was pretty cool reading and anyone who remembers those columns has an understanding of what Glen’s career was like for most of the 60s. Tommy Tedesco’s son, Denny, captured all of The Wrecking Crew‘s glory and history in his 2008 film The Wrecking Crew. Definitely see it if you haven’t.

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John Hartford

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John Hartford claimed to have written Gentle on My Mind “in a blur” after seeing the movie Dr. Zhivago. It was the lead song from Hartford’s 1967 album Earthwords & Music, an album that sounds like bluegrass filtered though novelty music and hallucinogenics. Gentle on My Mind is a very simple repeating chord progression with a descending melody line that ends each stanza. The lyrics and the imagery of the verses is well-constructed stream-of-consciousness and note the perspective of the song moves from the first verse of “behind your couch” to “some train yard” in the final verse. While the subject matter could obviously be interpreted as a drifter song; someone who is free to roam and still knows that a special someone loves him, another reading could involve a sort of Faulkner/McCarthy type of story (Suttree?) about someone who turns his back on a life of privilege (…rocks and ivy planted on their columns…). (Hartford, who was born John Cowan Harford came from a prestigious family). Perhaps the song serves as a metaphor for even bigger life-changing memories and the role people play in the lives of others.

In 1968 Glen Campbell became a superstar and although he had a hit with Jimmy Webb‘s By the Time I Get to Phoenix it was Gentle on My Mind that really launched this 2nd half of his career. Both he and the song’s writer, John Hartford, won two Grammy Awards each in 1968 for their performances of the song in the Country and Folk categories and in 1999 BMI announced that the song was number 16 in their Top Songs of the Century list. Personally, I think the above version is the best online performance: Hartford’s banjo sounds outstanding and notice how he conjures up images of a train clicking over the rails in between his sung lines in the first and third verses and how he and Campbell both completely go off and deviate from pattern and melody in the second verse. Glen shows how great an interpreter he is and was capable of always injecting different nuances into his performances so they never sounded the same. The fourth verse is a well-done duet that effectively pairs both their voices and personalities to close out the song. This performance serves as a microcosm of the tone of Glen’s television show and it’s easy to see why it was so popular. Wildly talented, good-looking and likable star and supporting cast play great music (and indulge in some comedy). A winning formula if there ever was one! While em>Gentle on My Mind isn’t a guitar number, Glen did pick a whole bunch of guitar on the show. Besides Hartford, who made frequent appearances during the show’s run, there were music performances from Three Dog Night, Stevie Wonder, Jerry Reed, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, The Monkees, Ray Charles Nancy Sinatra, Linda Rondstadt and many more. The show was on the air from 1969 through 1972 and after that Glen Campbell was a household name.

Unfortunately, as Glen’s star kept rising, he was encouraged by management to drop the guitar playing and concentrate on being The Rhinestone Cowboy singer. Country music began to be seen as passe in the mid-70s and because Campbell had so much success as a popular singer it was thought that the guitar image was too “Nashville”, even though hits like The Rhinestone Cowboy and Southern Nights only boosted his popularity. This is probably the main reason that many people never realized just how good a guitarist he is. Fortunately, Glen never stopped playing and there are many performances of his picking during the 80s and 90s preserved online. Not only did he pull out of his personal tailspin in the early 80s, but he became known for being the consummate singer AND player that he always was.

The above performance, really captures the essence of Glen Campbell — his signature song with the vocals and guitar playing people love. Who else can really do this tune? I think the word is ICONIC. While there are many guitar players who sing — Clapton, Richards, Harrison, Gilmour, etc, etc, there are very few singers who can really PLAY. According to his website, Glen Campbell had ‘Twenty-one Top 40 hits with two hitting No. 1. Six Top 20 albums including chart-topper Wichita Lineman. Twenty-seven country Top 10 singles — spanning 22 years — and nine country No. 1 albums.’ If all of the music he appeared on as a session musician is added to the list, his contributions to popular music are staggering! Since so much of his early work and popularity was from the 60s, he (and John Hartford) remind me of childhood and he’s always been there making music through my adult life as well. Though Glen will be leaving soon, he will leave many treasured gifts and memories behind; a multi-talented man, but first and foremost, a guitar picker par excellence!